• Moments in Military Medicine: The History of Hospital Ships
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    Moments in Military Medicine: The History of Hospital Ships

    The first hospital ships in the U.S. were used as early as the War of 1812 and continued to be used during the Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II. Commissioned ships were fully equipped for state-of-the-art medical care with operating rooms, x-ray machines, and ventilation.Today, the USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort are operated by the Military Sealift Command and provide hospital services for disaster and humanitarian relief. Their primary mission to provide emergency medical and surgical care for the deployed. Visit Health.mil for more information, and check out the National Museum of Health and Medicine to learn more about hospital ships.

  • GAO: Flooding at Fort Irwin
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    GAO: Flooding at Fort Irwin

    [ Background Music ]>>On August 25, 2013, Fort Irwin and its adjacent National Training Center was hit with an extreme rain event, in which approximately one year’s worth of rain fell in a very short period of time.>>And we got up to three inches of rain in about 80 minutes.>>The flooding caused by the storm damaged more than 160 facilities. In this barracks building, the flood water reached 15 feet high in the basement, damaging the boiler and electric system for the entire building. Eight roads, one bridge, and 11,000 linear feet of fencing were also damaged by flooding. The storm also caused damage at the National Training Center, which…

  • Military and Veteran Communities: Learn the Signs of Emotional Suffering and How to Help (60 sec)
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    Military and Veteran Communities: Learn the Signs of Emotional Suffering and How to Help (60 sec)

    ♪♪ William McNulty: You have served our country and made us proud. Many of you are still serving. Some of you have come home to our communities, where you continue to lead and contribute. McNulty: Some have come back from deployment to find new challenges at home. Air Force Officer: What’s the matter? McNulty: Every family can have challenges. Air Force Officer: Hey. McNulty: In or out of uniform, we need you to continue to serve and help your battle buddies, families, and communities. It’s important that we all learn the five signs of emotional suffering: personality change, agitation, withdrawal, poor self-care, and hopelessness. If you or someone you know…

  • 두남자의 첫 일본 캠핑 도전 2부(日本語字幕)
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    두남자의 첫 일본 캠핑 도전 2부(日本語字幕)

    The next morning. During the morning walk It was too late to see. It was such a beautiful camping ground. I couldn’t get the whole sound. The sound of the morning in the mountains was so beautiful. (There was a hiking trail.) And I like the moist feeling because it rained all night. It looks like a beautiful walk, but… Actually, it was so cold last night that I went to buy firewood. We were the only ones on the tent site. I think there were some teams in the cabin. Did you bring your wallet?) It was last night when I got up early, too. A god who cooks…

  • GAO: Poor Conditions at Military Depots
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    GAO: Poor Conditions at Military Depots

    [ Background Music ] About 80,000 people work at 21 Department of Defense industrial depots all over the United States preparing ships, aircraft, and ground vehicles. Many of these facilities were originally designed and built during World War 1 and World War 2. As a result, many facilities are not up to modern standards or large enough for efficient work. And more than half of all the depots rely on facilities that are on average in poor condition. For example, in one hangar, maintainers can only work on a single FA-18 Super Hornet at a time because the facility was never designed to handle the power requirements of modern aircraft.…

  • Military Transition to Civilian Employment: Expectations vs Reality
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    Military Transition to Civilian Employment: Expectations vs Reality

    While serving in the military, I ummmmm… I don’t have my coffee be right back That’s better While serving in the military, I would often think to myself. I can’t wait to be a civilian and work with adults Not saying the military acts like children, but if you’ve ever been in any leadership positions, you know what I’m talking about To say the least. I was sorely disappointed on my arrival to my first civilian project The only difference now is I don’t get in trouble for my co-workers childish behavior. In this video, I’m going to talk about Expectations vs. Realities transitioning out of the military Real quick…